Population

Photo of people walking

According to Statistics Canada, Canada's population in 2011 was estimated to be 33 476 688. This represents a growth of 5.9% since the 2006 estimate of 31 612 897.

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Population

Population Distribution, 2006

According to the 2006 census, the population of Canada was 31 612 897 on May 16, 2006. This map shows the population distribution, based on the population density and the population counts of census dissemination blocks. A dissemination block is generally an area the size of a city block bounded by intersecting streets. There are 478 831 blocks across Canada. In order to define the three population-distribution classes, the blocks for all of Canada were ordered by their population density, from highest to lowest. The population counts for each block were then used to determine where 75 per cent of the population lived, where 24 per cent of the population lived, and where less than 1 percent of the population lived.

Population Density by Census Division, 2006

With 3.5 persons per square kilometre, Canada is one of the countries with the lowest population densities in the world. Census metropolitan areas (CMAs) with the highest population densities—Toronto (866), Montréal (854), Vancouver (735), Kitchener (546), Hamilton (505), and Victoria (475)—were located close to United States border.

Population Density by Census Subdivision, 2006

With 3.5 persons per square kilometre, Canada is one of the countries with the lowest population densities in the world. Census metropolitan areas (CMAs) with the highest population densities—Toronto (866), Montréal (854), Vancouver (735), Kitchener (546), Hamilton (505), and Victoria (475)—were located close to United States border.

Aboriginal Identity Population by Census Division, 2006

According to the 2006 Census, the number of people who identified themselves as an Aboriginal person has surpassed the one-million mark, reaching 1 172 790 persons. In 2006, Aboriginal people accounted for 3.8% of the total population of Canada as enumerated in the census, up from 3.3% in 2001. This map shows the Aboriginal population as the percentage of the total population, by census division.

Aboriginal Identity Population by Census Subdivision, 2006

According to the 2006 Census, the number of people who identified themselves as an Aboriginal person has surpassed the one-million mark, reaching 1 172 790 persons. In 2006, Aboriginal people accounted for 3.8% of the total population of Canada as enumerated in the census, up from 3.3% in 2001. This map shows the Aboriginal population as the percentage of the total population, by census subdivision.

Labour Force

Labour Force Occupation, 2006 - Primary Industry (by census division)

Census data showed employment reached an estimated 16 021 200 in 2006, up 1 326 000 from 2001. Just two western provinces - Alberta and British Columbia - accounted for a third of this increase. During the same five-year period, the unemployment rate fell in every province and territory, except Ontario and the Northwest Territories. The shift in industrial demand for workers to different parts of the economy had an impact on the occupational make-up of the nation. The map shows by census division the percentage of the population employed in primary industry.

Labour Force Occupation, 2006 - Primary Industry (by census subdivision)

Census data showed employment reached an estimated 16 021 200 in 2006, up 1 326 000 from 2001. Just two western provinces - Alberta and British Columbia - accounted for a third of this increase. During the same five-year period, the unemployment rate fell in every province and territory, except Ontario and the Northwest Territories. The shift in industrial demand for workers to different parts of the economy had an impact on the occupational make-up of the nation. The map shows by census subdivision the percentage of the population employed in primary industry.

Labour Force Occupation, 2006 - Processing, Manufacturing and Utilities (by census division)

Census data showed employment reached an estimated 16 021 200 in 2006, up 1 326 000 from 2001. Just two western provinces - Alberta and British Columbia - accounted for a third of this increase. During the same five-year period, the unemployment rate fell in every province and territory, except Ontario and the Northwest Territories. The shift in industrial demand for workers to different parts of the economy had an impact on the occupational make-up of the nation. The map shows by census division the percentage of the population employed in processing, manufacturing and utilities.

Labour Force Occupation, 2006 - Processing, Manufacturing and Utilities (by census subdivision)

Census data showed employment reached an estimated 16 021 200 in 2006, up 1 326 000 from 2001. Just two western provinces - Alberta and British Columbia - accounted for a third of this increase. During the same five-year period, the unemployment rate fell in every province and territory, except Ontario and the Northwest Territories. The shift in industrial demand for workers to different parts of the economy had an impact on the occupational make-up of the nation. The map shows by census subdivision the percentage of the population employed in processing, manufacturing and utilities.

Labour Force Occupation, 2006 - Trades, Transport and Equipment Operators and Related Occupations (by census division)

Census data showed employment reached an estimated 16 021 200 in 2006, up 1 326 000 from 2001. Just two western provinces - Alberta and British Columbia - accounted for a third of this increase. During the same five-year period, the unemployment rate fell in every province and territory, except Ontario and the Northwest Territories. The shift in industrial demand for workers to different parts of the economy had an impact on the occupational make-up of the nation. The map shows by census division the percentage of the population employed in trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations.

Labour Force Occupation, 2006 - Trades, Transport and Equipment Operators and Related Occupations (by census subdivision)

Census data showed employment reached an estimated 16 021 200 in 2006, up 1 326 000 from 2001. Just two western provinces - Alberta and British Columbia - accounted for a third of this increase. During the same five-year period, the unemployment rate fell in every province and territory, except Ontario and the Northwest Territories. The shift in industrial demand for workers to different parts of the economy had an impact on the occupational make-up of the nation. The map shows by census subdivision the percentage of the population employed in trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations.

Labour Force Occupation, 2006 - Natural and Applied Sciences and Related Occupations (by census division)

Census data showed employment reached an estimated 16 021 200 in 2006, up 1 326 000 from 2001. Just two western provinces - Alberta and British Columbia - accounted for a third of this increase. During the same five-year period, the unemployment rate fell in every province and territory, except Ontario and the Northwest Territories. The shift in industrial demand for workers to different parts of the economy had an impact on the occupational make-up of the nation. The map shows by census division the percentage of the population employed in natural and applied sciences and related occupations.

Labour Force Occupation, 2006 - Natural and Applied Sciences and Related Occupations (by census subdivision)

Census data showed employment reached an estimated 16 021 200 in 2006, up 1 326 000 from 2001. Just two western provinces - Alberta and British Columbia - accounted for a third of this increase. During the same five-year period, the unemployment rate fell in every province and territory, except Ontario and the Northwest Territories. The shift in industrial demand for workers to different parts of the economy had an impact on the occupational make-up of the nation. The map shows by census subdivision the percentage of the population employed in natural and applied sciences and related occupations.

Language

Bilingualism, 2006 (by census division)

Canada has two official languages, English and French. In 2006, about 17.4% of the population were bilingual, as they were able to conduct a conversation in both official languages. People living in Quebec reported the highest percentage of being bilingual. New Brunswick, the only officially bilingual province in Canada, had the highest bilingualism rate among Anglophones (16.0%) outside Quebec. People living in Eastern Ontario and in the Greater Sudbury area also reported a higher rate of bilingualism compared to the other parts of Canada. For the rest of Canada, the rate of bilingualism varied among the provinces and territories. In some regions, the rate of bilingualism reached as high as 15%.

Bilingualism, 2006 (by census subdivision)

Canada has two official languages, English and French. In 2006, about 17.4% of the population were bilingual, as they were able to conduct a conversation in both official languages. People living in Quebec reported the highest percentage of being bilingual. New Brunswick, the only officially bilingual province in Canada, had the highest bilingualism rate among Anglophones (16.0%) outside Quebec. People living in Eastern Ontario and in the Greater Sudbury area also reported a higher rate of bilingualism compared to the other parts of Canada. For the rest of Canada, the rate of bilingualism varied among the provinces and territories. In some regions, the rate of bilingualism reached as high as 15%.

Aboriginal Languages by Community, 1996

The current 50 languages of Canada's indigenous peoples belong to 11 major language families - ten First Nations and Inuktitut. Canada's Aboriginal languages are many and diverse, and their importance to indigenous people immense. This map shows the major aboriginal language families by community in Canada for the year 1996.

Indian and Inuit Communities and Languages (1980)

Education

Highest Level of Educational Attainment, 2006 - Trades certificate (by census division)

The 2006 Census enumerated 13 012 475 adults aged 15 and over whose highest level of educational attainment was a trades certificate or diploma; a college, CEGEP or non-university certificate or diploma; or a university certificate, diploma or degree in 2006. This was an increase of 32% from 9 864 970 in 2001. In 2006, 23% of Canadians aged 15 and over had completed a university certificate, diploma or degree, 17% had completed a college, CEGEP or non-university certificate or diploma and 11% had completed a trades certificate or diploma. The proportion of the population aged 15 and over with a high school diploma or equivalent as their highest credential was 26% and those with less than a high school diploma or equivalent was 24%.

Highest Level of Educational Attainment, 2006 - Trades certificate (by census subdivision)

The 2006 Census enumerated 13 012 475 adults aged 15 and over whose highest level of educational attainment was a trades certificate or diploma; a college, CEGEP or non-university certificate or diploma; or a university certificate, diploma or degree in 2006. This was an increase of 32% from 9 864 970 in 2001. In 2006, 23% of Canadians aged 15 and over had completed a university certificate, diploma or degree, 17% had completed a college, CEGEP or non-university certificate or diploma and 11% had completed a trades certificate or diploma. The proportion of the population aged 15 and over with a high school diploma or equivalent as their highest credential was 26% and those with less than a high school diploma or equivalent was 24%.

Highest Level of Educational Attainment, 2006 - University certificate, diploma or degree (by census division)

The 2006 Census enumerated 13 012 475 adults aged 15 and over whose highest level of educational attainment was a trades certificate or diploma; a college, CEGEP or non-university certificate or diploma; or a university certificate, diploma or degree in 2006. This was an increase of 32% from 9 864 970 in 2001. In 2006, 23% of Canadians aged 15 and over had completed a university certificate, diploma or degree, 17% had completed a college, CEGEP or non-university certificate or diploma and 11% had completed a trades certificate or diploma. The proportion of the population aged 15 and over with a high school diploma or equivalent as their highest credential was 26% and those with less than a high school diploma or equivalent was 24%.

Highest Level of Educational Attainment, 2006 - University certificate, diploma or degree (by census subdivision)

The 2006 Census enumerated 13 012 475 adults aged 15 and over whose highest level of educational attainment was a trades certificate or diploma; a college, CEGEP or non-university certificate or diploma; or a university certificate, diploma or degree in 2006. This was an increase of 32% from 9 864 970 in 2001. In 2006, 23% of Canadians aged 15 and over had completed a university certificate, diploma or degree, 17% had completed a college, CEGEP or non-university certificate or diploma and 11% had completed a trades certificate or diploma. The proportion of the population aged 15 and over with a high school diploma or equivalent as their highest credential was 26% and those with less than a high school diploma or equivalent was 24%.